Nicholas and Timothy. Sad men.
aqqindex:

Laurinda Spear and Bernardo Fort-Brescia, Miami House

aqqindex:

Laurinda Spear and Bernardo Fort-Brescia, Miami House

(via pimpslapped)

(Source: gangsterdoodles, via pimpslapped)

besturlonhere:

jncos:

All you have to do is make .gifs of yourself wearing an ill fitting suit and, like, a fucking bow tie or w/e and it’s like this whole website creams itself

image

(via pizzabitesdon-tbite)

(via alanerate)

(Source: 500px.com, via dawgswaltz)

fabforgottennobility:

Suez

fabforgottennobility:

Suez

(via alanerate)

kevinruss:

Cold Creek, Nevada. April 2014

kevinruss:

Cold Creek, Nevada. April 2014

(via masterbaits)

thealgerian:

Al Qarara, Algeria

thealgerian:

Al Qarara, Algeria

(via besturlonhere)

(Source: mutant-radio, via post-capnjazzcore)

(Source: nickdrake, via vital-dust)

(Source: fruitsoftheweb, via hella-chilla)

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

(via alanerate)

9091kwan:

The Moorish Chief

9091kwan:

The Moorish Chief

(via pimpslapped)

pursuable:

Olivia ArthurSaudi Arabia Series

pursuable:

Olivia Arthur
Saudi Arabia Series

(via pimpslapped)

bitchville:

角島大橋 Yamaguchi, Japan by Imepicture

bitchville:

角島大橋 Yamaguchi, Japan by Imepicture

(via jakegyllenhaalelujah)